Division & Levels

Age Divisions

 

Although placement of dancers in our convention classes is ultimately at the teachers’ discretion, our competition age divisions are strict and are automatically configured by our online registration system.  

The competition age is based on the average age of the dancers in each routine as of January 1.  To determine the age division, our system will average the performers ages and drop the decimal point.  Example:  12.0-12.9 will compete in the 12-year-old (Junior) age division.  

All competing dancers must be prepared to present proof of age should a question arise.  

MINI AGE DIVISION: Average age of 8 & under
JUNIOR AGE DIVISION: Average age of 9-12
TEEN AGE DIVISION: Average age of 13-15
SENIOR AGE DIVISION: Average age of 16-19
ADULT AGE DIVISION:  Average age of 20 & up

 

Two Competition Levels 

 

Each routine at both our regional and national competition will be defined by our system as belonging to one of two competition levels, a performance level or a competitive level.  These two levels will exist for all age groups: Mini, Junior, Teen, Senior and Adult.  Individual and Overall Awards will be given to both competition levels for our Mini, Junior, Teen and Senior age division routines.  Adult age division routines will be given individual awards only at our regional competitions.    

During the convention registration process, you will name each dancer as either a ‘performance’ level dancer or a ‘competitive’ level dancer.  

Our Performance Level is for a dancer who trains an average of 1-4 hours of dance per week.  

Our Competitive Level is for a dancer who trains an average of 5 or more hours of dance per week.  

The two performance levels are designed to give dancers a more level playing field at competition, not to allow your best dancers to win more awards.  Dupree Dance has no way of ‘proving’ or ‘disproving’ the performance level of each registered dancer.  Teachers, we trust that you will use fair judgment and honesty when assigning a ‘performance’ or ‘competitive’ level to each of your dancers during the convention registration process.  Winning is great, but educating young dancers and raising them to perform with integrity is most important.  

During the competition registration process, our system will automatically place each dance in the correct competition level based on the combined level of the dancers in each routine.  Regional competition changes and/or changes to the assigned routine level will NOT be permitted within 2 weeks prior to the event you are registered for.  The following rules will apply:   


Duo and trio routines competition level rule:
Any duo or trio containing one or more competitive level dancers will be placed in the competitive division.

Group routines competition level rule:
Any group routine containing two or more competitive level dancers will be placed in the competitive division.

Line and Production routines competition level rule:
Any line or production routine containing four or more competitive level dancers will be placed in the competitive division.

Super production routines competition level rule:
Any super production routine containing six or more competitive level dancers will be placed in the competitive division. 

 

 

Dance Categories

 The various types of routines you can choose from per entry include:
    * Please review the additional note after the category descriptions below that outlines the amount of acrobatic tricks 

       per dance category.  

JAZZ -  Routine uses primarily jazz technique, utilizing up-tempo music.

TAP - Routine consisting primarily of tap technique. Routines demonstrating clogging technique and style may not compete in the tap category.

BALLET -  Primarily ballet technique, including classical steps and movements.  

POINTE -  Routine uses primarily classical pointe technique.  Pointe shoes only.

LYRICAL -  Routine consisting of dynamic emotion and expressive movements demonstrated with fluidity, balance, extension and control.  

CONTEMPORARY -  A fusion of many styles (primarily jazz and lyrical) with a strong emphasis on modern technique.
 

HIP HOP – Routine that focuses on the groove (rock or bounce) with influences of foundational urban, street, funk, or club styles.  Examples of such styles include (but are not limited to): bboy, locking, popping, krump, jooking, lite feet, and whacking.  

 

JAZZ FUNK– A commercial dance style that fuses a multitude of genres from ballet, modern, hip hop, jazz and lyrical.  A Jazz Funk routine contains highly syncopated musicality, involves intricate movement and typically exudes lots of femininity.  This style is commonly referred to as Street Jazz.


MUSICAL THEATRE - Any routine using Broadway or theater styles.  Song selection is from a Broadway, Movie, Musical or Television Show.  

NOVELTY - Routine featuring any style of dance that is novelty or theme based.  It must portray a recognizable character throughout.
 
OPEN - Routine demonstrating any dance style or combination of dance styles that is hard to ‘fit’ into any other category offered.  Consists of all other categories including, but not limited to ethnic, folkloric, pom, baton, cheerleading, etc.  Routines containing 4 or more gymnastic tricks may also opt to enter in the open category.

CLOGGING – routine that uses clogging/buck style. Clogging shoes only.

SONG AND DANCE – Routine containing both singing and dancing of any time.  Dupree will provide 1 hand held microphone only (upon request).  Dupree Dance does not allow any additional equipment to be hooked into the sound system, therefore, no personal microphones, headsets, etc. will be permitted.

ACROBATIC DANCE – A routine that combines classical dance technique with at least 4 or more acrobatic elements.  Acrobatic dancer routines are defined by their athletic character and use of acrobatics within a dance context.  Controlled movements and flexibility are used and elements like walkovers, aerials, backhand springs, etc. are incorporated.  

PARENT NUMBER (Regional events) - Routines that include, but are not limited to, the parents of dancers from studios that are registered at our event.  Participants in a parent number are required to pay the competition fee, but are not required to be convention registered.  Parent numbers are not eligible for Overall Awards.  A majority of dancers in a routine must be adults in order for that entry to be considered a ‘parent number’.  A studio must have registered dancers in both the convention and competition portion of our event in order to enter a parent number in our competition.  Parent names only (first and last name) will be requested during the registration process of a parent number.  During National Finals, Parent Number routines will fall under the Adult routine age division.  

SPECIAL NEEDS - Routines that includes dancers with special needs or disabilities who would like the opportunity to perform.  Participants in a Special Needs number are required to pay the competition fee, but are not required to be convention registered at the regional event in which they attend.  Special Needs numbers are not eligible for Overall Awards.  Dancers names only (first and last) will be requested during the registration process of a Special Needs number.  

* Note:  There is a maximum of three acrobatic tricks permissible in every category except our open and acrobatic dance categories.  Any routine consisting of 4 or more acrobatic tricks must be entered in the acrobatic dance or open category regardless of the style of routine that is mixed along with the acrobatic elements.  A deduction of 1 point per judge will result for routines that do not comply.  Acrobatic tricks are considered movements that pass through or stop at a fully inverted (upside down) position with both feet off the floor (the torso passing or stopping directly over the top of ones head/shoulders). Forward, backward and shoulder rolls, and acro tricks in lifts (a lift being defined as being supported by another dancer with any body part) are not considered acrobatic tricks.  A gymnastic pass will be counted as one trick (i.e. a round-off back-hand spring into a back flip = 1 trick)  3 dancers performing a gymnastics trick or pass in unison = 1 trick.  3 dancers performing a gymnastics trick or pass separately from one another = 3 tricks.